Mario

Svizzera, 2018, HD, 119', col.

director:

Marcel Gisler

Mario

For the first time in his life Mario has fallen in love. Head over heels. Leon is the new, muscular German striker bought by the football club he plays for. They share the same apartment, which becomes their love nest. Nobody must know about their love affair, owing to the taboo that still surrounds homosexuality in sports. And that's not all: they are competing against each other for a position in the first team that would turn their careers around. Mario is not worried about this, because the only thing he really wants is to be with Leon. The situation becomes complicated when rumors start to spread about their relationship, stoked by homophobia. It is only then that Mario understands that he is at a turning point: between his own ambitions and his love for Leon, which will he choose? Football and gayness: a still controversial combination, where it seems intolerance continues to prevail.

screenplay

Thomas Hess, Marcel Gisler, Frédéric Moriette

editing

Thomas Bachmann

photography

Sophie Maintignieux

costume design

Catherine Schneider

makeup

Jean Cotter

sound

Marco Teufen, Felix Bussmann

music

Martin Skalsky, Christian Schlumpf, Michael Duss, Pirmin Marti

cast

Max Hubacher, Aaron Altaras, Jessy Moravec, Jürg Plüss, Doro Müggler, Andreas Matti, Joris Gratwohl

producer

Rudolf Santschi, Theres Scherer-Kollbrunner

production

Triluna Film AG

 

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Marcel Gisler

Biofilmography

Marcel Gisler was born in 1960 in Altstätten, Switzerland, although he has been living in Berlin since 1981. He studied at the Free University of Berlin and since 1985 he has been working as a producer, scriptwriter, director and teacher in several German and Swiss cinema schools. Among his films are: Tagediebe (1985), which won the Best First Film Award at the Locarno Film Festival in 1985, Schlaflose Nächte (1988), winner of the Ernest Artaria Award at the Locarno Film Festival in 1988, Die blaue Stunde (The Blue Hour) (1992), Madeleine (1998), F. est un salaud (Fögi Is a Bastard) (1998), for which he won the Best Film Award at the Swiss Film Prize in 1999, Rosie (2013) and Electroboy (2014).